• Physical Therapy Tips Week 5

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    Gross Motor Skills

    GROSS MOTOR ACTIVITY
    Set up an obstacle course:
    use ropes, balloons, sticks, chairs, pillows
    work on climbing over, crawling under and even going around! Make it fun!! Add music, do it outside or inside!!

    MOTOR FACTS
    Research has shown that an increase in physical activity has a significant positive effect on cognition, especially for early elementary and middle school students (Sibley, 2002). As an added bonus, being physically fit as a child may make you smarter for longer as you grow old. (Deary, 2006).
    Helpful Suggestions for healthy lifestyle:
    5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables every day
    2 hours or less of recreational screen time every day
    1 hour or more of physical activity every day
    0 sugary drinks and more water every day

    Activity websites:
    https://www.ot-mom-learning-activities.com/gross-motor-activities.html
    https://www.livestrong.com › Parenting
    www.schoolsparks.com/early-childhood-development/gross-motor
    https://handsonaswegrow.com/gross-motor-activities-preschoolers/

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  • Physical Therapy Tips Week 4

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    GROSS MOTOR ACTIVITY
    Engage in motor games:
    *Walk like a duck
    *Walk like a bear
    *Walk like a crab
    *Gallop like a horse
    *Crawl like a cat
    Another fun activity is to have both participants stand on pillows and pull with a rope in a game of tug of war. This is beneficial for balance and also for upper extremity and core strengthening.


    PROVIDE TIME FOR OPEN ENDED PLAY
    Provide time for open ended play where children are climbing, riding, running, and jumping. Activities that target the core muscles such as animal walks, swimming and tug of war and highly beneficial to get fit for school.

    Learning standards provide the Core strengthening provides the foundational skills necessary for drawing, writing, cutting with scissors and various other school tasks that children need to do with their hands and fingers.

    Therapist, teachers and parents can learn to help young children get ready for school age with the Get Fit for School Webinar (75 minutes) by Ingrid C. King MScOT, BOT.
    It can be purchased at Yourtherapysource.com
    Your Therapy source.com

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  • Tips from Physical Therapy Week 3

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    Gross Motor Skills

    GROSS MOTOR ACTIVITY

    Engage in motor games:
    Simon says:
      • *stand on 1 foot
      • *touch your nose
      • *jump up and down
    Hokey Pokey

    Preschool state standards can be found at:
    http://www.pakeys.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/2014-Pennsylvania-Learning-Standards-for-Early-Childhood-PreKindergarten.pdf

    Preschool standards do exist in the state of Pennsylvania.

    Learning standards provide the framework for learning. They provide the foundational information for what children should be able to know and do in order to guide teachers. Gross motor section of these standards include:

    10.4 PK.A Demonstrate coordination of body movements in active play.
    The child will:
    • Combine large motor movements with the use of equipment. (e.g ., ride a tricycle, using feet to pedal; catch a ball; throw a bean bag or ball overhand with aim; kick a ball)
    • Move and stop with control.
    • Use outdoor gross motor equipment.
    • Run with control and direction.
    • Engage in gross motor games. (e.g., Hokey Pokey, London Bridge, Simon Says)
    • Perform a variety of movement alongside and with a partner

    10.4 PK.B Exhibit balance while moving on the ground or using equipment.
    The child will:
    • Engage in large motor activities that require strength and balance. (e.g ., marching, hopping, running, jumping, dancing, walking tip-toe)
    • Walk on a balance beam.
    • Climb stairs using alternating feet.
    • Participate in an obstacle course going through tunnels, over or under equipment.

    These are preschool skills that should be developing or developed as a child approaches kindergarden.

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  • Tips from a Physical Therapist Week 2

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    Gross Motor Skills

    MOTOR FACTS:
    What are Gross Motor Skills? MOTOR FACTS:
    Gross Motor Skills involve the abilities needed to control the large muscles of the body for walking, running, sitting, crawling, and other activities. The benefits of developing gross motor skills and incorporating physical activity into a young child’s day include: long-lasting good health that comes from regular physical activity, increased confidence and the improved self-esteem that comes from being able to successfully take part in games with other children, release of stress and frustration through physical activity and improved school skills.


    Gross Motor Activity: (This can be done outside with sidewalk chalk)
    Tape a shape on the floor: Have your child
    1. Jump to a shape you name
    2. Crab walk to a shape you name (triangle)
    3. Bear crawl to a shape
    4. slither to a shape
    5. Run to a shape


    Local Connections for Organized Motor Activities From
    Swimming to Soccer:

    Lawrence County YMCA: 724-658-4766
    Y zone: 724-658-9211
    Butler County YMCA: 724-287-4733
    Grove City YMCA: 724-458-9781
    Shenango Valley YMCA: 724-981-6950

     

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  • Tips from a Physical Therapist - Week 1

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    Early Intervention Age

    Age 5 years gross motor skills of a typical child:
    Hops on one foot
    Performs jumping jacks and toe touches
    Walks up and down the stairs while carrying objects
    Catches a ball with two hands
    Bounces a ball in place
    Skips rope

    Gross Motor Activity: Some Fun outdoor activities:
    Get Outside
    Run/roll down a hill and run back up
    Try a game of hockey using pool noodles instead of sticks
    Draw hopscotch grid using sidewalk chalk
    Introduce jumping rope
    Ride a bike with and without training wheels
    Swimming or jumping in a sprinkler

    Balance and Coordination Activities
    When children are engaged in games and activities that promote better balance and coordination, their bodies learn to focus faster and more efficiently. If your child can develop the mental energy to control their balance and coordination automatically without having to think about it, they can then free up their brain for processing information, listening to the teacher and focusing on higher learning concepts.

    One of the greatest brain gains of exercise is the ability for physical activity to improve actual brain function by helping nerve cells to multiply, creating more connections for learning (Cotman, 2002; Ferris, 2007). Research has shown that an increase in physical activity has a significant positive effect on cognition, especially for early elementary and middle school students (Sibley, 2002). As an added bonus, being physically fit as a child may make you smarter for longer as you grow old. (Deary, 2006).

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